Author: Ariel Mintz, MD

Perinatal depression is a condition that affects 25% of women during or after pregnancy. However, it is often not discussed, leaving those suffering from it to feel ashamed and alone. Refuat Hanefesh is holding a Live Conversation tonight at 8:30pm est with Bari Mitzmann to take this illness out of the shadows and show support Read More …

SUICIDE. It is a scary word that no one wants to talk about. However, there is a suicide once every 16 minutes in America. Suicide occurs across all communities and age groups. Suicide rates are increasing among young people and it is now the second leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of Read More …

A sobering look at the life-changing effects parents can have on their children’s success even in the most hopeless situations.

This week’s Torah portion (Ki Teitzei), encourages us to not turn a blind eye towards the loss or destruction of another person’s possessions, even if that person is not a friend. Rather, one should act assertively to help save or recover those valuables. The Talmud extends this principle further to include saving one’s life.   Read More …

Attaining wealth and living the good life is nice, however, it can have untold negative consequences if not framed in the correct way.

The principles of AA have been around for 3400 years. Learn about the similarities between the 12 steps and Moshe’s strategy of rebuke.

Bilaam and Balak teach us important lessons about how even through insincere actions we can positively change who we are.

In this week’s Torah portion (Korach), we witness one of the most famous biblical arguments. Korach gathered a group of people to contest the power of Moshe and Aharon. Moshe and Aharon attempted to discuss the matter with those who felt slighted. However, their opponents stayed firm refusing to enter into conversation and ultimately greater Read More …

In this week’s Torah portion (Shelach), spies are sent to explore Israel in preparation for conquest. They were given several tasks including assessing whether the land was fat or thin. The Ohr Hachaim interprets this to mean, is the land capable of producing healthy produce year after year or are the nutrients quickly depleted, requiring a fallow Read More …